Clinical Trials FAQ

FAQs

Learn more about participating in the clinical trial process and find a trial near you

The Clinical Trial

Before you join a clinical trial, read everything you can about the condition and treatment. If interested, you can discuss it with your usual healthcare provider or reach out directly to the clinical research team. Bring whatever remaining questions you have to the research team during your screening. Important considerations include benefits and risks, what you will have to do during the trial and the requested time commitment.

There are a wide variety of professionals involved with any clinical trial, all of whom are vital to ensuring safety and success. The principal investigator, or PI, leads the trial and directs the team of doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers. The clinical trial coordinator manages day-to-day activities and is the main contact for participants. Many clinical trials also have an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) who periodically reviews data to ensure participant safety, and sometimes effectiveness.

For the best possible clinical trial results, participants should attend each scheduled trial visit. If you have a conflict, please contact your research team in advance to adjust your schedule.

Participants are always welcome to visit their usual healthcare providers during a trial. Sometimes, it is important for healthcare providers to collaborate with the research team to ensure success.

When you reach the end of your participation in the trial, you may meet with your regular healthcare provider to determine further care options. If you are a healthy volunteer, your commitment is over. Keep in mind that researchers can decide to end trials earlier than
expected.

After your participation ends, the study may continue for months or years. Once final results from all participants are compiled and analyzed, they are often published publicly. Clinical study report (CSR) synopses and plain language summaries (PLSs) may be made available for certain studies. Check with your clinical trial site or send an email to [email protected] to learn more.